March 20th, 2012

Honda 3R-C Concept

This revolutionary three wheeled battery electric vehicle concept shows what a future minimal urban transport vehicle for one person might look like. The battery electric drivetrain is mounted low in the three wheeled chassis, therefore keeping the centre of gravity low and thus improving stability.

The 3R-C has a clear canopy that covers the driver’s seat while it is parked and not in use. When 3R-C vehicle is in motion, the canopy becomes an enveloping wind-shield that provides the pilot, who sits low in the vehicle, with significant protection from the bodywork and doors.

The high sides of the safety shell seat give greater safety to the occupant, reducing the threat from side impacts and improving weather protection. In front of the driver is a lockable boot area, which gives significant secure storage for luggage or other items. The 3R-C’s designers created a flexible cover that surrounds the upper torso to reduce exposure to bad weather and improving comfort.

The 3R-C study was created by European designers working at Honda’s Research and Design facility in Milan.

March 18th, 2012

Paris 26 Gigapixels

Paris 26 Gigapixels is a stitching of 2346 single photos showing a very high-resolution panoramic view of the French capital (354159x75570 px). Dive into the image and visit Paris like never before!

www.paris-26-gigapixels.com/

March 15th, 2012

Junya Ishigami: KAIT Workshop

This is a studio/workplace constructed on the Kanagawa Institute of Technology campus in the suburbs of Tokyo.
 The client wanted this structure to be a place where students could work on diverse self-initiated projects to make things, and to also have a high public capacity, as it would be open for use by local children.
With regard to the flexibility this building required, I saw little need to tailor sections of the plan very differently according to the various programs it would house, as each of the individual spaces would necessarily be specialized to some extent. Then, to ensure that users would be have the freedom to alter the spaces to meet different needs within a reasonably short time period, it began to make more sense to me to pursue flexibility in the relations between adjoining places, and in the way various spaces are connected with each other. This view led to the thinking that some soft, ambiguous kind of borders could be invented by raising pillars in a random fashion.
To be specific, I wanted to provide no earthquake-resistant walls, but make this building work on just an ensemble of slight pillars of varying proportions. What shape the sections would be, the coordinates and the angles of the pillars would be adjusted by the millimeter. How “densely set” should the pillars be? Resultant spaces would be best open toward which directions and to what extent? The studies we did to examine these issues became quite extensive. We did models in numerous scales ranging from small to extremely large. Sketches were made with the plan depicted in dots, to explore just what kind of spaces would exist between pillars. Studies of the plan were done with a program written for this project on an special CAD. We had an Excel program created to do trial calculations and give us general ideas on the structural soundness, and so on.
All these were carried out simultaneously throughout, and in the end we were able to arrive at a structure that stood on 305 pillars, almost none of which had identical sections or angles. At the same time, borders between individual places emerged, as a result of these pillars.
Even as I, the architect, am creating the space deliberately and with clear intent, I am not the one who can tell you what determined the decisions made. Is the basis structure, function, or design—? I had hoped for this, for even the borders between such bases to become indistinct.
In fact I would say that in an ideal building the pillars would have the same presence or outward bearing, and be formed on the same dimension as, the surroundings, the furniture and the greenery. I was hoping, by creating all elements equally strong in presence—as well as possible—that a very generous and productive degree of flexibility could be achieved.
I was interested, I would say now, in the promise held by a kind of abstractness having nothing to do with the abstractness that we consider a property of diagrams and such.

 Junya Ishigami

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

March 11th, 2012

Lebbeus Boods: The High House

The High Houses are proposed as part of the reconstruction of Sarajevo after the siege of the city that lasted from 1992 though late 1995. Their site is the badly damaged “old tobacco factory” in the Marijn dvor section near the city center.

The concept of the project is simple. The houses rise up high into the airspace once occupied by falling mortar and artillery shells fired by the city’s besiegers in the surrounding mountains. By occupying the airspace, the High Houses reclaim it for the people of the city. Balancing on scavenged steel beams welded end-to-end, they are spaces of a new beginning for Sarajevo, one that challenges—in physical terms—the city’s past and present, aiming at a future uniquely Sarajevan. Stabilized by steel cables anchored to the site, the houses, poised like catapults, fulfill the paradoxical desire to fly and at the same time be rooted in their place of origin.

These houses are not for everyone. Indeed, probably only a few could master their challenges. Yet each mastery would manifest a spirit of courage and inventive skill in the name of all who must reinvent a city transformed by destruction.

Lebbeus Woods

March 10th, 2012

The Sandpit

A day in the life of New York City, in miniature.

The film used 35,000 photographs, shot over five days in New York to produce, with music composed by Human and co-written by Rosi Golan and Alex Wong.

Produced by Sam O’Hare

Likes

An independent platform focusing on stories and ideas about architecture.

Networks